13 November 2013

Trip to Williamsport: Not more than a trickle

I mentioned in my last post that the first time I went to Williamsport was with a college buddy who insisted I see Indiana's tallest waterfall.  Yeah right-we had just come from his nearby farm in Illinois that was so flat you could see lights from towns nearly 50 miles away.  But he insisted....so I went along with it and we ended up in Williamsport.  The problem was, it was about 10:00 p.m, and while I could hear a slight trickle of the waterfall tucked in behind the downtown....I couldn't see anything.
A very dry Williamsport Falls
This time my visit was in broad daylight....the problem this time was that there wasn't even a trickle.  The Williamsport Falls is 90 feet tall-that's impressive-but it does go dry, so if you plan a visit go in the spring.  During the winter the falls is known to produce a reverse ice volcano.

Fall Creek Gorge and the Potholes
Prior to visiting the falls my client insisted that he show me "the potholes" as we prepared to leave the farm I was documenting.  The potholes?  Typically one would avoid those I thought to myself.  The look in my eyes must have given my thoughts away because he laughed, asked if I minded gravel roads, and then said follow me.  As we sped down rural Warren County roads, kickin' up dust, I felt like I was back in high school or college again out looking for trouble....and certain to find it.


The "potholes" are part of the Fall Creek Gorge Nature Preserve owned and managed by the Nature Conservancy since 1986.  The gorge has steep stone canyons and rushing waters that have formed potholes in the stone stream bed over thousands of years.  Just a warning if you go-the rock surfaces at the creek are very slippery-as my client quickly learned as he did a cartoonish road runner reenactment, without falling which left me highly impressed.  The preserve has been described as "modern art on an ancient canvas".  I'll buy that.  It was pretty moving and would have to be even more breathtaking at the height of fall color.  It's a little tough to find, but it is located on "Pothole Road" just off Highway 41 north of Williamsport.

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

first I had to find out where Williamsport is?! Then in the process of googling it I discovered a picture of the falls that shows the apartment complex that is built right behind it, some "treasure" there?

vanilla said...

We wound our way through Williamsport to find the state's tallest falls. Dry as the proverbial bone. Haven't yet had the pleasure of a visit to the potholes. Well, I mean, besides the ones in the street in front of the house.